Scouts gather in Curaçao for the 15th Caribbean Jamboree

Try to contain your jealousy.

While you and I are at the office this week, a few Scouts and Scouters from the BSA are on an island in the Caribbean.

The contingent is representing the Boy Scouts of America at the Caribbean Jamboree, held on the island of Curaçao off the Venezuelan coast. They’re meeting Scouts from Aruba, Jamaica, Bermuda, Venezuela and elsewhere. They’ll return with new friends and a lifetime of memories.

The 15th Caribbean Jamboree started Monday and lasts a week, and you can follow along on the official Facebook page.

Interested in being considered to represent the BSA at future international events like this one? Be sure you’re regularly checking the BSA’s International page on scouting.org.

Photos of Scouts arriving at Caribbean Jamboree

Here are some of my favorites. Check out all the different uniforms and neckerchiefs.

Barbados
Barbados
Grenada
Grenada
Barbados
Barbados
Aruba
Aruba
Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
Trinidad and Tobago
USA
USA
Guyana
Guyana
Aruba
Aruba
Bonaire
Bonaire
Venezuela
Venezuela
Anguilla
Anguilla
Sint Maarten
Sint Maarten

14 Comments

  1. Nations attending the 15th Caribbean Jamboree in Curacao are:
    Anguilla, Aruba, Barbados, Bonaire, British Virgin Islands, Curacao (the host country), Denmark, Grenada, Guadalupe, Guyana, Jamaica, Martinique, St. Martin, Trinidad & Tobago, United States of America (first time to attend), Venezuela.

    • This to me furthers my opinion that the isolatory nature of the BSA is ever present and seems to becoming more common. It saddens me to think that the US did not bring a contingent to the Caribbean Jamboree until the 15th Jamboree.

      Question……………Why does the US seem to not realize the importance of the international aspect of Scouting? We must change this and it will only change if we (BSA members) unite and demand that national direct more efforts and energy to the international aspect.

    • I was a member of the BSA contingent to the Sixth Caribbean Jamboree in Jamaica in 1977, and the BSA sent a contingent to the 5th and probably others.

      • Well, now that I know that, I’m not as saddened by the whole situation. But even with that I stand by my original thoughts that the BSA does an absolute terrible job when it comes to awareness and promotion of the international perspective on Scouting.

  2. The BSA does a horrible job at providing the “international perspective” of Scouting and this must change. Too often I talk to both youth and adults who think that Scouting is only in the United States and is not an international movement with more than 38 million members around the world with that number growing each year according to the latest membership statistics available from the WOSM.

    A couple of suggestions that I have include the following:
    A) Including requirements in new ranks and awards that bring about an awareness that Scouting is an international movement.
    B) Promoting and better coordination efforts when it comes to JOTA/JOTI.
    C) Requiring Local Councils to have an International Representative and an International Scouting Committee that are both functioning and actively involved in their local council.
    D) Sharing and teaching about the World Crest.
    E) Incorporate a Scout Investiture component into every unit.
    F) Coordinating and promoting exchanges of culture and traditions of Scouts from other countries.
    G) Improving the International Division of the BSA website.
    H) More promotion and awareness of the various International Events that the BSA members are eligible to attend.
    I) Announcement of international events earlier than the current timetable. Many of these events are scheduled more than a year in advance but are only shared in the US far too close to the time of the event to allow Scouts the opportunity to plan and prepare for the event.
    J) Stop treating international events/experiences as an exclusive club or members that are exclusive in nature.
    K) The creation of an Award that focuses the role of the BSA in the World Scouting Movement.
    L) Requiring Scout Heritage MB in order to become an Eagle Scout. Also revision or additional requirements to further promote the international aspect of Scouting.

  3. It might be slow coming and has to start somewhere. This is a good start. We had a choice to go to the Caribbean or Iceland. The U.S. is getting up to speed. Our boys are enjoying every moment of this experiance and Curacao has been a fantastic Host. The other countries are both friendly and loving towards us.

    • No the US isn’t getting it. If they were getting it, there would be much much much more awareness. The current state of affairs when it comes to the international perspective of Scouting in the BSA is doing horribly! When need to engage in MORE international opportunities ASAP. We (the BSA) has become so detached, so isolated from Scouting as an international movement.

      I admit we are getting better but the time it is taking is way too long. We must get onboard when it comes to Scouting worldwide. Heck most leaders I talk to in the BSA thinks the biggest religion in Scouting is Christianity. It isn’t christianity, it is Islam. But those in the BSA would never believe that fact.

  4. It might also help if going to the World Jamboree didn’t cost $5700. If they can’t arrange trips for a more reasonable price, then why bother.

    • Yes it is mighty ridiculous that the World Jamboree is going to cost $5700. Here are some of the break downs of that price (rough estimates; based upon experience):
      1) World Jamboree Fee: World Scout Conference approves the fee. However, not every country pays the same amount per person. Instead it is a tiered system based upon the country’s GDP. Tier 1 (US, UK, Australia, Canada) pays the highest while Tier 4 (Chad, Madagascar) pays the lowest. Estimates for tier 1 is USD$1000 (Exact amount TBD). Tier 4 around USD$400 (Exact amount TBD).
      2) Flight: The Flight from a “gateway city” is included. My rough estimate for the flight is around USD$1200-USD$1500. Gateway city is determined by National and may not be a local airport. For example in 2007 with me being from the Troop out of CO our gateway city was LA.
      3) General Liability/Travelers Insurance: Who knows the cost, but it will probably be pretty high based upon what the norm for liability insurance is in the US. Because of our litigation friendly (abuse) society.
      4) Lodging/Tour: Usually a university campus or other big dorm type facility with daytime tour activities for 2-3 days. Other countries (some, not all) reduce the tour price by participating in home-hospitality or Ho-Ho. Ho-Ho is where a a small group of Scouts (2-4) stay and get an immersed cultural experience. Ho-Ho is no longer an option for the US due to YPT guidelines and the litigation-happy society we live in.
      5) CMT (Contingent Management Team): Made up of volunteers and professionals. Volunteers have to pay their way themselves. Professionals is depends on position. Basically the fee for Scouts/Leaders helps to cover CMT costs and year round WSJ/NSJ support staff (Used to be called Jamboree Department; after reorganization I have no clue). Also includes staff from the international division.

      Thats a brief down and dirty overview from what I have collected, researched, or heard from various sources (professionals/paraprofessionals/volunteers) I know. This is information may not be 100% accurate and therefore should be treated as such.

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