Bryan on Scouting

NESA scholarship recipients: Where did they end up going to college?

Where are some of the brightest young Eagle Scouts attending college?

At world-class institutes of learning like BYU, UC Berkeley, Ohio State, Notre Dame, Cornell, Yale and many more across the country — and around the world. (I’m looking at you, Eagle Scout who’s attending Franklin University Switzerland!)

As college-bound Eagle Scouts fill out their NESA scholarship applications before the Oct. 31 deadline, we thought it would be interesting to take a look at where some past recipients went to college.

An analysis of National Eagle Scout Association scholarship recipients — never before released to the public — reveals where these high-achievers are pursuing their higher education.

Thanks to NESA’s Jeff Laughlin, I’ve got the breakdown of 2017 and 2016 recipients below. You can see if any NESA scholarship recipients attend your alma mater, as well as check out which schools have more than one recipient in attendance.

Which schools can boast the most NESA scholarship recipients over the past two years? Here are the top three, whose campuses are conveniently pictured above from left to right:

What are NESA scholarships?

Eagle Scout scholarships are a big part of the National Eagle Scout Association’s mission. For the current scholarship window, NESA plans to award at least 150 scholarships with amounts ranging from $2,000 to $50,000 per recipient.

Eagle Scouts have until Oct. 31, 2017, to apply for the latest round of cash for college. Learn more here, and don’t delay.

While college-bound Eagle Scouts rush off to finish those scholarship applications, the rest of us can look at where recent recipients have chosen to use those funds.

2017 recipients by college/university

The list includes 142 recipients. Eagle Scouts who chose to defer the use of their scholarship funds for one or more years aren’t included in the list.

2016 recipients by college/university

The list includes 140 recipients. Eagle Scouts who chose to defer the use of their scholarship funds for one or more years aren’t included in the list.