Scouting Films

Videography tips from Scouting’s black-and-white film era

In the age of Smartphones and GoPros, the concept of documenting Scouting adventures in video format isn’t a novel idea.

But in the 1930s, capturing troop meetings and outdoor activities posed a bit more challenge. (Think heavy 16-millimeter-film cameras using portable projectors and screens to show footage.) FilmProjector

Yet, even with these technical hurdles, Scouters and Scouts of the era realized that showing Scouting on film was not only a way document activities, but also a way to help recruit more boys to the movement.

In the April 1930 issue of Scouting — viewed in the Scouting magazine digital archives — the column “Motion Pictures in Scout Work,” by Allan A. Carpenter, examines the value of capturing Scouting on film. The article also points out some timeless cinematography tips that GoPro-wearing Scouts can use today to help make excellent videos.

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Investigate the archives for a chance to win a Stanley thermos

This month, we’re rolling out a fresh gear giveaway with a new twist: Instead of simply entering for a chance to win, readers must first investigate the Scouting magazine Archives to answer an elusive question.

Hop on over to the Bottled History contest to read the secret inquiry. (And if you solve the riddle, keep it to yourself so that you’ve got an extra advantage!)

Guess right and you may be one of five randomly selected winners to receive a limited edition 100th anniversary Stanley thermos ($40).

Just like Scouting magazine, Stanley is celebrating its 100th anniversary this year. To kick off the bottle maker’s centennial, Stanley released a special 100th anniversary edition of its classic, steel-body thermos that holds 1 liter of fluid—keeping it hot or cold for up to 24 hours!

Read more about entering the contest, which ends March 31.

Good luck!

The three winners of the Snow Day Giveaway will be announced soon. Please stay tuned!