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Which state had the most Eagle Scouts in 2015?

Once again, Utah takes the crown.

No state produced more Eagle Scouts in 2015 than Utah. Thanks in large part to the strong support Scouting receives from the LDS church there, 5,765 young men became Eagle Scouts in Utah in 2015.

Utah is No. 1 on the list for at least the seventh year in a row. That’s every year since 2009 — the first year for which detailed Eagle Scout statistics were made available to me.

California, Texas, Pennsylvania and North Carolina round out 2015’s top 5. See the complete list — 1 to 50 — below.

1 Utah 5,765
2 California 4,887
3 Texas 4,125
4 Pennsylvania 2,378
5 North Carolina 2,066
6 Virginia 2,035
7 New York 1,949
8 Ohio 1,834
9 Illinois 1,663
10 Arizona 1,632
11 Florida 1,632
12 Georgia 1,560
13 New Jersey 1,485
14 Missouri 1,417
15 Washington 1,371
16 Idaho 1,309
17 Michigan 1,213
18 Maryland 1,106
19 Minnesota 1,037
20 Colorado 999
21 Massachusetts 975
22 Kentucky 952
23 Wisconsin 921
24 Tennessee 907
25 Indiana 882
26 Oregon 677
27 Connecticut 663
28 Kansas 647
29 South Carolina 629
30 Alabama 573
31 Nevada 557
32 Iowa 554
33 Oklahoma 484
34 Nebraska 384
35 Louisiana 351
36 Mississippi 349
37 Arkansas 260
38 Rhode Island 246
39 Hawaii 236
40 New Mexico 218
41 New Hampshire 190
42 West Virginia 190
43 Montana 177
44 Maine 169
45 Wyoming 153
46 South Dakota 134
47 Alaska 132
48 Delaware 119
49 North Dakota 99
50 Vermont 82

But wait! It’s not really fair to look at these numbers without adjusting for population. I mean, of course more young men will become Eagle Scouts in the nation’s most-populous state (California) than in its least-populous (Wyoming).

So …

Which state had the most Eagle Scouts in 2015 after adjusting for population?

Utah tops this list as well, but the population-adjusted numbers move these states into the top 10: Idaho, Wyoming, Missouri, Rhode Island, Kansas and Kentucky.

California, second on the original list, drops to No. 40 on the adjusted one.

  1. Utah
  2. Idaho
  3. Wyoming
  4. Virginia
  5. Arizona
  6. Missouri
  7. Rhode Island
  8. Kansas
  9. Kentucky
  10. North Carolina
  11. Nebraska
  12. Nevada
  13. Washington
  14. Minnesota
  15. Pennsylvania
  16. Connecticut
  17. Maryland
  18. Colorado
  19. Alaska
  20. Iowa
  21. Montana
  22. Oregon
  23. New Jersey
  24. Hawaii
  25. Wisconsin
  26. Ohio
  27. South Dakota
  28. Georgia
  29. Texas
  30. Massachusetts
  31. New Hampshire
  32. Tennessee
  33. Indiana
  34. Vermont
  35. North Dakota
  36. Illinois
  37. South Carolina
  38. Maine
  39. Delaware
  40. California
  41. Oklahoma
  42. Michigan
  43. Alabama
  44. Mississippi
  45. New Mexico
  46. West Virginia
  47. New York
  48. Arkansas
  49. Florida
  50. Louisiana

What were the 2015 numbers for Eagle Scouts who don’t live in the 50 states?

Eagle Scouts don’t just live in the 50 United States. They’re everywhere.

Puerto Rico 166
Transatlantic 143
Far East 90
Direct Services 20
Washington, D.C. 15
Virgin Islands (now merged into council No. 082) 3

For more Eagle Scout stats, click here.

46 Comments on Which state had the most Eagle Scouts in 2015?

  1. Are you basing the adjustments of Eagle Scouts per capita simply on the total population of people in the state…or the number of registered BSA members in the state? I’d love to see the numbers not just adjusted by state population, and also by the state’s BSA membership. I’d also love to see which states have the most BSA members and the most Scouts per capita.

    • Bryan Wendell // February 25, 2016 at 8:02 am // Reply

      Good point, Mark. This is the total population per state, not the BSA membership per state. So while it gives us a better picture than the raw numbers alone, it’s still somewhat flawed.

  2. Do you have the number of Scouts per state? Would be interesting to see not just which states have the highest concentration of Eagle Scouts, but which ones have the highest concentration of Scouts.

  3. Since Trapper Trails council covers parts of Utah, Idaho, and Wyoming did all of their numbers count just for Utah or did the applications get sorted by state? Also the same would apply for Grand Teton council as well.

    • Fred Chabonique // April 29, 2016 at 8:27 am // Reply

      Similar thing for the Narragansett Council in Rhode Island. A significant portion of that council is Massachusetts, more now after a recent merger.

  4. So proud of Missouri’s scouting programs!

  5. Way to go, Nevada Area Council (and Las Vegas)! Ranking by population pulls us from 31 to 12!

  6. Here’s ratings of where the highest concentration of Eagles are on a map… https://pbs.twimg.com/media/CcEq2o6WwAAai2r.jpg

    • Looking at the numbers laid out on a map and the list Bryan provided here, there is really no clear correlation as to what causes a state to be a better (or worse) breading ground for Eagles (rural/urban, red/blue, liberal/conservative,big/small, northern/southern, eastern/western, religious/secular, rich/poor, education, crime, etc,) It’s really nice to see that becoming an Eagle isn’t influenced by political, religious, geographic, economic, educational or other superfluous factors. The only significant correlation I can see here is LDS population (thus Utah, Idaho and Wyoming topping the list).

      • It’s highly related to the LDS population in an area. I hate to say it, but many (NOT ALL) units in the LDS Church and some councils in LDS-populated areas do not hold scouts to the same standards as other places. I see way too many “merit badge factories” and way too many “you show up, here you go” merit badges in LDS units. Some of the camps in the councils located in Utah are notorious for giving away merit badges at camp. My father went to a GSLC camp, where in 5 days, he had a scout who returned home with 14 merit badge blue cards signed off at a GSLC camp. No way you can do 14 in the time allotted for classes in a 5 day period, yet, someone signed all of those cards. I’ve seen way too many Eagle Scouts in Utah who couldn’t even tell you much about their own Eagle projects. Many of them simply consist of collecting donations from local church members to drop off at a local charity. I see them all of the time in Utah. I’d bet that a great % of units in Utah don’t even camp a full 24 hours each time they camp (excluding weeklong.) Now, I am sure I will be blasted for my statements, but I still stand by them.

        • Remind me where it says that overnight campouts have to be a full 24 hours? Does a boy-led patrol/troop overnighter that is less than 24 hours not qualify for advancement?

          Sadly, some of what you describe has happened, and still may persist. Much of this is due to lack of training, for both youth and adults. Sometimes parents put too much emphasis on advancement to Eagle, resulting in less than desirable outcomes, which dilute the scouting experience.

          But I’ve observed the bar being raised in many areas in Utah. I see huge efforts in TTC, GSLC and UNPC to increase the value of the council summer camp experience. I also see an increase in the scope and quality of Eagle projects, at lest in my district ( http://springvillescouts.org/ ).

        • Kudos, Scouter Mama. You’ve hit the nail on the head. I live in Utah and am LDS and I can only say that scouting in Utah is considered a rite-of-passage. So many parents think that if their son isn’t an Eagle then he’s doomed for life. I’ve been involved for many years with scouting, an assistant and Scoutmaster, young men leader and it’s sad. The leaders don’t care if a boy really earns or learns. Case in point, a boy who wasn’t active in his troop for over four years, yes he never came to any meetings then suddenly a week before he turned 18 he wanted me to sign off his Eagle, I told him he hadn’t been in the troop for years and I didn’t feel right doing it, I even contacted Trapper trails and they told me point blank, “It isn’t your place to keep a boy from becoming an Eagle”. And all I said was I didn’t want to sign off and be a part of the fraud. He didn’t even complete the basic requirements set forth by the BSA, that part about being active in the troop. He miraculously got those last three merit badges logged in and got his Eagle with hours to spare, but it was a family tradition. I can only wonder if he thinks the world will be as free of ride as scouting was. The same boy came to me to get his Family Life some years earlier and when I went over the requirements his mother called and told me if I didn’t give it to him she’d find someone who would. Then there was the boy who couldn’t get his drivers license until he got his Eagle (Yes that happens a lot in Utah) He hadn’t done one thing for Family Life and his 16th birthday was a week away. I tried to explain to his mother and she told me “Fine, you can be the reason he doesn’t get his license.” So I thought I might shame her and went to her house with the blue card (mind you he hadn’t done anything in any class I taught). I asked his mother if that was what she needed, she snatched the blue card and thanked me. Did I miss something here?Or there are the merit badge POW WOW’s. I took boys from the troop and again the Family Life was being taught there (I was tired of fighting and thought I’d let someone else do it). It was a three week pow wow, three hours each night, one hour per badge, so the maximum was three merit badges, well some boys got five, do the math. However the best was the boy who got his Family Life in the three weeks. This is how it went, week one the counsellor didn’t show, week two, the counsellors son showed in his absence, week three the son showed again. He then passed the kids off on the Family Life badge. I asked a boy what about the 90 days of tracking the chores, the counselor said to back date and fill in the chart, they surely did chores, they were scouts. The project to better the home? The counselor was sure they had done something at one time or another around the house. It was a joke. And don’t get me started about camp. Leaders encourage the boys to get more, more, more. The scout motto in Utah should be Quantity Always, Quality Never. I’ve seen leaders that show no ethics, they are out for everything they can get, kids come late or never show at classes and leaders demand badges, competition is great but poor sportsmanship is better? Seems that way. One class the kids were in was Pulp and Paper, two 30 minute classes, 40 scouts and the highlight of the class was a group of scouts following a moose in the field across from where the badge was being taught for most of the time. This was a record even better than the boy with Family Life, Pulp and Paper in 20 minutes. I’m a firm believer that a boy can get nine or ten badges in a week at camp, what he learns there won’t help in life unless they are looking for a way to beat the system. I find it comical that California, a state with nearly 13 times the population of Utah has over 15% less Eagle scouts. The joke in Utah about the mother getting the Eagle is a black mark on scouting. And then there are the leaders who make sure to tell the boys to put that they’re an Eagle scout on a job application, from what I’ve seen over the years the employer is the one who will lose in that respect. I could tell more but lets just say that scouting doesn’t have the shine it used to for me and we are raising a generation of boys who really don’t know what it is to be a real scout.

        • when I just joined scouting (a few weeks after my crossover) I went to a merit badge jamboree. It was put on by a neighboring LDS troop. I “earned” the camping merit badge in 2 hours.

          Of course, my scoutmaster immediately rejected this and I had to start all over (which was completely fine by me).

          By the time I got my Eagle, I’d spent over a year on the camping merit badge.

          Troops like that are tarnishing the Eagle Scout rank. They’re detracting from those scouts who put in years of hard work.

        • I earned 15 badges one summer, and I did all the requirements. A couple I had to prep before camp, like I already had half my 50 insects mounted and identified before arrival (but I ended up with close to 70 by the time I was done). I just worked efficiently and communicated with counselors. I was 15 at the time. Later I started working for that camp and saw two Scouts competing for how many badges they could earn in a week. They hadn’t done any preparation for it other than being good Scouts and they ended up in a tie with 14 each. They were 17 years old and had joined when they were 14, so they still had a lot of options to choose from and had the maturity to complete them quickly by working with the Counselors in a one on two setting in drop in periods or going into meal times.

        • shade_tree // June 30, 2016 at 8:57 pm //

          I agree a lot of what you say probably occurs, HOWEVER as for the overnights LDS scouts are often limited to camping on Friday nights during most of the year as they are not allowed to camp and avoid travel on Sundays.

      • I’m not defending the practice of camps who are too casual about their staff awarding merit badges. But … we (unit of generally Christian boys, no LDS) did have one scout who hit near that number.

        He would go to each program area and ask what badges were doable in a day (like pulp and paper, fingerprinting). So, he would work on the two or three week long badges, and a 1 day badge in the morning and another 1 or 2 in the afternoon.

        We would follow-up with staff to make sure he indeed demonstrated the requirements. They were satisfied.

        I would still insist that it’s better to earn the same number throughout the year. But, my point is that this need not merely be an LDS concern.

  7. Mike Strasburg // February 25, 2016 at 12:26 pm // Reply

    Good to see IL was in the running. I too think the number of Eagle should also be based on the number of registered Scouts. Eagle Class of 1966.

  8. Sad on the NY & FL #s.

    • Randall Moore // February 26, 2016 at 11:03 am // Reply

      Eagle class of 1980. GO SCOUTING!

  9. Can we get a Council adjusted one? I would love to see where the councils rank.

  10. Also the Mormon church requires their youth to be in scouting and Utah probably has the largest members of the Mormon church.

    • Note also that The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints pays the BSA registration fees for their own boys as well as boys of other faiths who wish to participate in LDS sponsored Scouting units.

      I know of several units, including my own unit, who have a few boys of other faiths participating in scouting. Of those boys of other faiths in the mountain west, I’m not sure how many decided to become eagle scouts, but I’m sure there’s a handful.

      As a parent of a 2015 eagle scout, who’s a Mormon from Utah, I can attest to the rigors of a significant Eagle Scout Service project and to the personal, family and community involvement/sacrifice it takes to help boys become eagle scouts.

      • Yes, like the Eagle scout projects for food collection and my favorite, cleaning snow from fire hydrants, Utah lets kids slide and I say this from being in the middle and trying to hold the kids accountable only to hit roadblocks with parents and other leaders. In ten years out of a couple of dozen boys I can think of three or four projects that would use the words rigors and significant. I applaud your son. Please share his project.

  11. Not to be a whiner and I know the numbers may seem trifling next to the fantastic ones we are seeing………but what about Silver?

    • Nahila Nakne // February 29, 2016 at 9:54 am // Reply

      Or the Sea Scout Quartermaster and the new Venturing Summit?

  12. I wonder who was number 1 when I got my eagle scout back in 09..

  13. looks like they are handing out eagles in California

    • We hand them to every boy that earns one. I think that’s how it’s supposed to go, but I might be misunderstanding how the program works.

  14. In our Council the percentage of Scouts who earned the rank of Eagle last year was 7.5%. We were also the number 1 Council in the BSA for Cub Scout Advancement. Nothing was “given away”, all was earned. Suffolk County Council #404

  15. Just to add another dimension.. two states that jumped a lot were Kansas 28 to 8 and Missouri, 14 to 6. Both states benefit from the influence of the Tribe of Mic-O-Say

  16. Chris Craven // March 18, 2016 at 7:51 pm // Reply

    We should always focus on the QUALITY of the scouting program that produced these Eagle Scouts, and not be concerned with the QUANTITY of Eagle Scouts.

  17. What we really should be asking in Utah is how many adult leaders are willing to be properly trained!! The Great Salt Lake Council is only just over 20%. I think the leaders need to follow the example of these Eagle Scouts. Its called FOLLOW THOUGH WITH YOUR COMMITMENT.

    • I’ve been a Scout Master for 2 years now in Utah, I completed all basic training soon after joining. Did a week at Wood Badge (which was amazing) and have attended University of Scouting both years (with hundreds of other participants). No Eagle Scouts yet but we are camping a lot and learning how to be better together 🙂

    • shade_tree // June 30, 2016 at 9:02 pm // Reply

      Part of the issue in LDS troops is scout leaders are “called” within the church and start acting immediately in that roll. Often times its only for the duration their boy is in that segment of their parochial training (deacon, teacher, priest, etc) so the “leader” doesn’t even stay in long enough to bother being fully trained.

  18. Jim Rockford // April 11, 2016 at 8:14 pm // Reply

    First I’d like to say that the Boy Scout Program in Utah is flawed. I live here and am LDS and I can only say that scouting in Utah is considered a rite-of-passage. So many parents think that if their son isn’t an Eagle then he’s doomed for life. I’ve been involved for many years with scouting, an assistant and Scoutmaster, young men leader and it’s sad. The leaders don’t care if a boy really earns or learns. Case in point, a boy who wasn’t active in his troop for over four years, yes he never came to any meetings then suddenly a week before he turned 18 he wanted me to sign off his Eagle, I told him he hadn’t been in the troop for years and I didn’t feel right doing it, I even contacted Trapper trails and they told me point blank, “It isn’t your place to keep a boy from becoming an Eagle”. And all I said was I didn’t want to sign off and be a part of the fraud. He didn’t even complete the basic requirements set forth by the BSA, that part about being active in the troop. He miraculously got those last three merit badges logged in and got his Eagle with hours to spare, but it was a family tradition. I can only wonder if he thinks the world will be as free of ride as scouting was. The same boy came to me to get his Family Life some years earlier and when I went over the requirements his mother called and told me if I didn’t give it to him she’d find someone who would. Then there was the boy who couldn’t get his drivers license until he got his Eagle (Yes that happens a lot in Utah) He hadn’t done one thing for Family Life and his 16th birthday was a week away. I tried to explain to his mother and she told me “Fine, you can be the reason he doesn’t get his license.” So I thought I might shame her and went to her house with the blue card (mind you he hadn’t done anything in any class I taught). I asked his mother if that was what she needed, she snatched the blue card and thanked me. Did I miss something here?Or there are the merit badge POW WOW’s. I took boys from the troop and again the Family Life was being taught there (I was tired of fighting and thought I’d let someone else do it). It was a three week pow wow, three hours each night, one hour per badge, so the maximum was three merit badges, well some boys got five, do the math. However the best was the boy who got his Family Life in the three weeks. This is how it went, week one the counsellor didn’t show, week two, the counsellors son showed in his absence, week three the son showed again. He then passed the kids off on the Family Life badge. I asked a boy what about the 90 days of tracking the chores, the counselor said to back date and fill in the chart, they surely did chores, they were scouts. The project to better the home? The counselor was sure they had done something at one time or another around the house. It was a joke. And don’t get me started about camp. Leaders encourage the boys to get more, more, more. The scout motto in Utah should be Quantity Always, Quality Never. I’ve seen leaders that show no ethics, they are out for everything they can get, kids come late or never show at classes and leaders demand badges, competition is great but poor sportsmanship is better? Seems that way. One class the kids were in was Pulp and Paper, two 30 minute classes, 40 scouts and the highlight of the class was a group of scouts following a moose in the field across from where the badge was being taught for most of the time. This was a record even better than the boy with Family Life, Pulp and Paper in 20 minutes. I’m a firm believer that a boy can get nine or ten badges in a week at camp, what he learns there won’t help in life unless they are looking for a way to beat the system. I find it comical that California, a state with nearly 13 times the population of Utah has over 15% less Eagle scouts. The joke in Utah about the mother getting the Eagle is a black mark on scouting. And then there are the leaders who make sure to tell the boys to put that they’re an Eagle scout on a job application, from what I’ve seen over the years the employer is the one who will lose in that respect. I could tell more but lets just say that scouting doesn’t have the shine it used to for me and we are raising a generation of boys who really don’t know what it is to be a real scout.

  19. Interesting stats, but remember, it’s quality not quantity. An Eagle Scout is a rank, but more importantly it’s being a leader. Nothing negative here, just keeping the focus of the purpose of scouting.

  20. Catherine Smith // April 28, 2016 at 4:28 pm // Reply

    We are involved with Troop 101 in Temple, TX and by no means “give away” badges. The boys have to work for them. If they don’t complete all the requirements, they don’t earn the badge. ~Eagle Scout mom, Eagle class of 2013.

  21. Nice data and good to see the adjustment for population. I already guessed Utah would be #1 with the support of the LDS church.
    NOW — I REALLY HOPE NEXT YEAR you would break out the Direct Service, TAC and FEC by country! Having been in both of these councils a combined 14 years, it would be nice to have list by country. As currently the FEC Advancement Chair I would be willing to help! Exciting and a great feeling to see these young men earn their Eagle Scout overseas, as my son did in the Philippines and others in China and Australia come to mind.
    I have a great idea for you to spotlight Eagle Scout Projects overseas! There are some amazing examples!

  22. Tony Sherfinski Eagle Class of 1977, Daughter - GS Gold Award Class of 2015, Son - 2 MB left for Eagle Class of 2016 // April 28, 2016 at 9:53 pm // Reply

    T439 Samoset Council – North Central WI As Scoutmaster, I insisted our boy’s earned their ranks. I was not always popular with the parents. Sad commentary on what is happening out west. The numbers do make you wonder.

  23. Steve Sutton // April 29, 2016 at 4:25 am // Reply

    Quick question is the balance between the % Scouts achieving Eagle compared with the total Scout population effecting the value of the award. i believe the % is a lot higher than has been in the past and I read stories of 13 years old ticking all the boxes just a thought ?

  24. accordion man // April 29, 2016 at 10:51 am // Reply

    Have you reviewed the Eagle Scout projectsand rated tthem for complexity and community value? Many Eagle protectsiI have seen required little planning, effort to complete or community value.

    • “REQUIREMENT 5. While a Life Scout, plan, develop, and give leadership to others in a service project helpful to any religious institution, any school, or your community. (The
      project must benefit an organization other than Boy Scouting.) A project proposal must be approved by the organization benefiting from the effort, your unit leader and unit committee, and the council or district before you start. You must use the Eagle Scout Service Project Workbook, No. 512-927, in meeting this requirement.”

      That’s the requirement – no mention of complexity and community value.

      • J S Sterling // July 1, 2016 at 1:44 pm // Reply

        Tipdog, I disagree. My reading of the requirements leads me to believe that a facile project with minimal value shouldn’t make the grade.
        Complex: … plan, develop, and give leadership to others …. proposal must be approved by the organization … and … and …. use … Workbook.
        Community value: … a service project HELPFUL to any religious institution, any school, or your community. … A project proposal must be approved by the organization BENEFITing …. {EMPHASIS ADDED}

  25. Somewhere I remember hearing that all male LDS youth are required to be in scouting and their only way out(prior to aging out of scouting) is Eagle. Is this true? If so, that may explain a lot.

  26. Interesting…There does seem to be a little bitterness out there. Instead of trying to complain about the LDS Chruch involvement, maybe try to figure out what is working with them. I often hear whining about LDS units and how sometimes weak they are, but the difference is when they are weak, they still function. As a District Commissioner, I’ve noticed that the community units just die off and disappear when they struggle. The biggest difference is the Chartered Organization concept. I noticed it was a little better when I was on the East coast, but the majority of community units have no true Chartering Organization. They may be at a Church or club, but often they are a Scout unit borrowing space with little connection to the organization. The result is there is no strong impetus for the program to continue – it becomes more like an after school club. The CO relationship is one in which the community members have a strong motivation for Scouting to work in their neighborhood – but it seems like in our quest for quick increases in joining, we have ignored the CO concept – but that is where sustainability and growth exist in Scouting.
    So many people have this idealistic idea of what a Scout Troop should be – a living Norman Rockwell painting. They are missing the point. Scouting is there to provide a way for young men to develop character, citizenship and fitness. There are many paths to that end. We often hear the intense hiking troops belittle those who car camp (read the comments from the post about troop trailers). Others complain about some units playing GI Joe. If it helps young men accomplish the aims, and uses the methods, then it is a Scouting group and is just as legitimate.

  27. LaVon Grandy // August 7, 2016 at 8:11 pm // Reply

    I am totally appalled at the negative comments here. I’ll grant you that not all units are created equal, but shame on all of your put downs for those hard working parents, unit leaders, and scouts. I happen to be from a family of scouters as far back as my father in the 1940s and 1950’s. My father was a Scout Master that earned his Eagle Scout along with his boys in a day and time they were allowed to do that. My own brother and several in their troop were not able to earn the Eagle Scout highest rank because swimming was a requirement and there was no pool in our rural town in Idaho. My father spent his own money to take boys to a pool 50 miles away to try to help them. My brother never learned to swim. My father did not hand him his merit badge for advancement. My father and others were dedicated leaders giving much time, money, and service on behalf of helping turn boys into honorable young men. In spite of the fact they didn’t earn the highest rank, they learned many skills. I can attest to that from being a witness.
    Fast forward to my sons. Yes, mothers and parents are a great help and influence in assisting their sons towards advancement. My eldest son went to the National Jamboree in Morraine State Park, PA. It was costly for transportation, uniforms, and all it consisted of. It rained practically the entire duration of the Jamboree. He returned with dirty moldy uniforms that had to be destroyed. Did he learn anything there? Of course, he learned among other things what it means to have dedicated leaders to follow after and emulate. This same son has been called to be a Scout leader in many capacities for years. He has a goal to teach every possible skill to every boy possible in SLC. Do you have a clue what it is like to go snow cave camping multiple times a year mostly in sub zero weather? To purchase equipment out of your own pocket that is needed for a troop or for a boy or two that can’t afford the fees or equipment? What it costs to continually transport boys and equipment? Or do you know how many times those leaders are limited to the time they have to spend with their families because they have a dedication to a program to turn boys into honorable men? The pay off is for them to be able to spend time with their own sons. In my sons case, he mentored his two sons along to their Eagle Ranks. Those parents work right along with them through their Eagle Scout projects. They learn family values along the way. One of his sons became a Jr. Leader and enjoyed assisting younger scouts along their advancement paths.
    My younger son also became an Eagle Scout and was awarded his rank when we first moved to Alaska. He had earned it in Idaho before the move but it hadn’t been approved before the move. The Scout Master there was struggling with his unit. My son offered encouragement and assistance and was a great example for the youth there. The newspaper wrote a big article in the local newspaper on our Island about his advancement and the benefits of the Souting program. There had only been one other Eagle Scout from the Island before. It’s not about the recognition. It’s about being an example for other youth. It’s about dedicated leaders that care about making our nation and world a better place in which to live. It’s about youth that want to be engaged in worthwhile and meaningful futures to reverse this topsy-turvy world from violence and terror into a nation of healing. This can only be accomplished by people willing to dedicate their lives of service to integrity. This second son of ours now has a son that earned his Eagle Scout just this Spring and his last son is very close to earning his Eagle. I’ve seen these parents take full advantage of being with their boys every step of the way supporting and encouraging them, even to doing the 50 mile bike rides with them and bringing extended family along to enjoy the outing.
    One more comment I read above about handing out 14 merit badges at scout camp. I happen to know that in many instances, the boys are well on their way to completing those requirements before even going to camp because dedicated leaders have helped them along the way, often times for weeks preparatory to attending camp.
    I say, don’t sit back and whine and complain. Get involved! Be the kind of leaders and parents and family you’d like to see raise boys to manhood. It isn’t about which state has the most number of boys as Eagles. It’s about EACH individual boy and their worth no matter which state they live in. Every state needs the kind of leadership these boys can continue to offer throughout their lifetime!

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