How to check if your Boy Scout troop or Cub Scout pack has unclaimed money

A Boy Scout troop in Longview, Texas, has more than $2,100 in unclaimed funds in its name.

In Riverside, Calif., there’s a Cub Scout pack that’s owed more than $700.

Packs and troops in Punxsutawney, Pa.; Corvallis, Ore.; and Brownsburg, Ind. can collect more than $100 each.

From sea to shining sea, Scout units are owed money from the government, banks, credit unions or other sources. In some cases, the amount is $10 or less. But in a few instances, there are hundreds or even thousands of dollars awaiting Scout units.

You just have to know where to look.

I searched through state-level unclaimed property websites using phrases like “Cub Scout pack” and “Boy Scout troop.” In each state I checked, there were several successful hits.

Could your Cub Scout pack or Boy Scout troop be owed money? There’s an easy way to find out.

Instead of letting that cash sit there, claim it and put it to work to benefit your Scouts.

How to see if your pack or troop is owed money

  1. Start by going to your state’s unclaimed property site. Find a state-by-state directory here.
  2. Put your unit number in the search field under “business.”
  3. If you get a match, download the claim form and have your unit’s treasurer send it in. Check with your chartered organization representative as well. The state will want proof that you’re eligible to claim the cash.
  4. Wait for your check, and deposit the money into your unit’s bank account.

Note: Individuals can have unclaimed money, too. After you check for your Scout unit’s unclaimed property, check your own name, too.

Important: Consult your chartered organization

It’s possible this unclaimed money actually belongs to your chartered organization, whether that’s a religious institution or a community group. Always check with your chartered organization representative in matters of money.

Important: Tax implications

For info on how this windfall of cash might impact your taxes, consult a financial advisor.


Thanks to John Stewart and Tim Bouchard for the blog post tip!