Pennsylvania borough renames street after Eagle Scouts

Three boys in the Lennon family earned the Eagle rank. So did the three boys in the Smith family, who live behind the Lennons. Two families with six Eagle Scouts living within a block of each other in Bridgeville, Pa. — a borough of 5,300 people near Pittsburgh. What are the odds of that happening?

“The chances of this are very low, something like this occurring in a very small neighborhood,” Adam Kenerwell told the Bridgeville council. “The chances of that are less than winning the Powerball lottery.”

Kenerwell, the senior patrol leader of Troop 2, made a case to honor the Eagle Scouts at a Bridgeville Borough Council meeting last month. The council members obliged, voting unanimously to change the name of an alleyway between the two streets where the families live to Eagle Way.

“The troop is excited about it,” says Norm Miller, Scoutmaster of Troop 2.

Making the change wasn’t a hard one for the council.

“The Scouts have a very positive presence and influence in our town and it’s an honor to be able to do this for them,” says Council President Mike Tolmer.

Bridgeville’s Boy Scouts

The Scouts in the Lennon and the Smith families make up six of Troop 2’s 69 Eagles. Larry Lennon Jr. earned his award in 1994, Justin Lennon in 1997, Colin Lennon in 2003, Caleb Smith in 2011, Daniel Smith in 2015, and Matthew Smith earned his Eagle last July.

Troop 2 began on April 28, 1982, after the Women’s Club of Bridgeville offered to charter a Boy Scout troop. The troop gave back to the club by shoveling snow and mowing the lawn around the building. Troop 2 quickly outgrew the building, swelling to 50 members. The Rotary Club of Bridgeville-South Fayette stepped in to serve as the new chartering organization.

The troop stays active in the community, participating in the Memorial Day parade, taking care of trails, doing landscaping at the local cemetery and handling flag ceremonies at the Special Olympics. Scouts also help out during the Wreaths Across America campaign, which honors fallen veterans. Many of the Scouts’ Eagle projects have supported the city’s historical society.

Other Scouting streets

This story had us thinking about other roads named after Boy Scouts. Pathways leading up to camps excluded, do you know of some Scouting-inspired streets in your city? Share them in the comments below. Here are a few we found after a brief Google search:

About Michael Freeman 17 Articles
Michael Freeman, an Eagle Scout, is associate editor of Boys’ Life, Scouting and Eagles’ Call magazines.