Life Scout to fellow Scouts: Do not rush your journey to Eagle

The true reward of becoming an Eagle Scout isn’t the fanfare at the finish but the experiences along the way.

That’s why Cameron, a Life Scout in Troop 424 of Katy, Texas, wrote a letter encouraging his fellow Scouts to slow down and enjoy the journey.

“I really would like for other Scouts to see and understand how rushing your Eagle isn’t the best option for Scouting,” he writes. “Scouting should be something that you want to do and not a chore.”

Through Scouting, Cameron (on the left in the photo above) has made lifelong friends, learned to communicate more effectively and become a better leader.

“If a Scout was to rush and not experience the path toward Eagle, he will not understand how to lead a group of young men his age,” he writes.

See Cameron’s complete letter, which he agreed to let me share on this blog, below.

Enjoy the journey

My name is Cameron, a Life Scout in Troop 424, currently working on my Eagle.

I am finishing my final Eagle requirements. I am here to let others know that Scouts should not rush their Eagle but enjoy their path to it. Rushing will stress you out, and in the end you miss out on the full experience Scouting has to offer. I really would like for other Scouts to see and understand how rushing your Eagle isn’t the best option for Scouting. Scouting should be something that you want to do and not a chore.

One of the most important factors that Scouting will give, even after you have finished, are friendships that will last for years. Friendships form because of the things you have in common with fellow Scouts, and you learn about the person when you go to meetings and campouts with them.

Friends will also limit you so that you don’t go out and rush your Eagle because then you’d leave them in the dust. My friends and I stuck together and waited for each other to get to the same rank in order to complete our Scouting journey together.

A Scout also learns effective communication through Scouting by becoming a leader. Leaders are able to communicate to an audience and move projects forward. But leaders don’t just happen; a leader has to learn from others and not by themselves. If a Scout was to rush and not experience the path toward Eagle, he will not understand how to lead a group of young men his age. Yes, people can learn through classes or parents, but Scouting gives you an opportunity.

Don’t rush a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. Take the time necessary to learn and comprehend what Scouting is giving you: friendships, leadership and a path in life.

Take it for a goal — not a chore.