money

Upon further review, troop’s grocery-bagging fundraiser isn’t permitted

fundraisingUpdate, Feb. 7: See more explanation and answers to questions left in the comments below at this post.

I stand corrected.

Yesterday I blogged about a troop that raised money by bagging groceries for tips at a local supermarket.

Today I learned that such fundraisers aren’t permitted by the Boy Scouts of America. Mark Moshier, team leader for the BSA’s Development and Corporate Alliances and Council Fund Development teams, was friendly and helpful in providing me with an explanation as to why this type of project isn’t allowed.

Be sure to read Mark’s full explanation below, but the essence is that the project involves “solicitation of funds,” he writes. “Only the BSA national organization and local councils are authorized to solicit funds in the name of Scouting.”

I should say that several wise volunteers who commented on yesterday’s post knew something was fishy with the project idea and should be commended for staying aware of these important rules.

Today Mark gave me a copy of “Funding Your Scouting Program,” an official BSA training video I posted to YouTube. Watch it below. It’s 13 minutes and worth your time if you’re at all involved with fundraising in your pack, troop, team, post, ship or crew.

Thanks to Mark for this clarification. Please read his official response to yesterday’s post:

Mark Moshier’s response

The Boy Scouts of America has provided long-standing guidelines on permissible fundraising activities for its units. These guidelines are intended to clearly define to the Scouting community and the community at large the role in fundraising of the National Organization, Local Councils and Units. These guidelines are based on the Charter and Bylaws and Rules and Regulations of the Boy Scouts of America and in compliance with IRS regulations related to nonprofit organizations. They are reviewed on a regular basis by committees of the National Executive Board as the fundraising environment is constantly changing.

The Unit Money Earning Application provides a great source for guidance on permissible fundraising activities and is available from your local council or online at this link (PDF).

Additional guidance can be found in a Frequently Asked Questions document available at this link (PDF).

The key issue with the fundraising activity described in the Bryan on Scouting blog post is the issue of solicitation of funds. Only the BSA national organization and local councils are authorized to solicit funds in the name of Scouting. Units are permitted to earn money by participating in council-sponsored fundraising activities such as Popcorn sales and Camp Card sales and through the sale of products on their own such as candy bars, Christmas wreaths and trees and other direct sales.

Units can also deliver a service and charge a fee. Examples include a car wash, or a unit that cleaned up after a community festival, conducted by their charter organization, and collected all of the beverage cans and then turned them in for the deposit amount.

In the activity featured on the blog, the unit is providing a service, but as identified by several commenters, by seeking tips are really soliciting a donation, which is not permissible.

Funding Your Scouting Program: A Training Video

168 thoughts on “Upon further review, troop’s grocery-bagging fundraiser isn’t permitted

  1. Bart wrote and commented “People are saying that National/Council won’t approve anything unless they get their cut are referring to the money that National/Council get from selling popcorn.”

    National doesn’t get a cut from popcorn sales. Period. This is a local Council promotion and not a “national promotion”. Only two-thirds of all of the local BSA Councils sell popcorn; and that money goes in a split to support and sustain the Council’s operations and programs as well as to individual units to support and sustain their program. Popcorn sales only accounts for a tenth to two-tenths of a Council’s annual budget, which is why only two-thirds of all of the BSA’s local Councils even bother with it.

    “No, they don’t want a cut of car wash money, that’s why they mandate that popcorn must be purchased by the unit before orders are placed and why they reserve a cut of the profits. If National didn’t want a cut off the money they’d just let the units earn money.”

    Bert, the local Council BUYS the popcorn from Trails’ End or the other popcorn vendor. Then they turn around and dole it out to units who participate and those units are responsible for selling it and accounting for the sales, which depending on the local Council, amounts to a third or so of the sale of a popcorn tin. The other third goes to Trails End (NOT to “National”; again this is a LOCAL COUNCIL deal and NOT a “national mandated thing”) and a third goes to the unit.

    “Would I buy a wreath or card or tree or popcorn from some random kid? Of course not.”

    I bet you do. We all do. When those beggers…er…kids…come around selling things for school or church or community, we all find a few dollars to buy their wares. It’s part of being a part of a community and part of many kids’ growing up.

    “When National says that kids can’t try to make money as Scouts, that just seems greedy to me.”

    They ARE selling things to help their unit, Bert. They just can’t sell them wearing the official uniform — because the implication is that they are selling it “for National”. See…you wrote it yourself here in that above sentence. The fact is that when Scouts sell things and they are wearing a uniform that somehow they are selling it for the national organization. THEY ARE NOT. They are selling it for their local Council (if they approved the sales in uniform) OR they are selling it for their unit (in which they cannot be in uniform and cannot say “Boy Scouts sales” or “Cardinal Council sales”. There’s nothing wrong with “Troop 000 sales”, however; and there’s nothing wrong with the Scout explaining that they raising the money for camp or the Jamboree or a trip to Cancun with the rest of the Troop.

    “When I was a Scout, we raked yards and did a lot of fundraisers. We charged a fair price and we did great work but I believe we got our feet in the door because we were Scouts. Would you hire some random group of kids to take your yard? Probably not.”

    If my yard needed raking, I’d hire them. As long as they did a great job, I’d even recommend them to my neighbors and that croutchy old maid down the street too *smiling*!

    • Mike, I appreciate your clarifications. One question that I still have – youth are not to be in official uniform for most fundraisers. What if the unit has unit activity shirts and they all wear those for the car wash, yard raking, grocery bagging, etc.? Is this allowed or would it fall under the uniform prohibition? If my troop t-shirts have the BSA logo but say Troop XXXX, does that give the impression that funds are going to the BSA or to the Troop?

      • A uniform is a uniform….whether it’s the official field uniform or an activity uniform, as in the popular polo shirts or tee-shirts with a BSA logo. The public will still perceive this as the “BSA” doing the activity instead of “Troop XXX” doing the activity (even if, unfortunately, the shirts have “Troop XXX” on the shirts). I know that you and I will be able to “tell the difference” but the average person out there can’t make that leap that the fundraiser is for a specific Troop instead of the national organization (or its local affiliate).

  2. Councils and National want their cut. National may not get the cut directly but they surely must get some money kicked upstream and they don’t want to lose that. Especially now that they’ve lost members due to the all new gay-friendly BS of A. Have the corporate donations started rolling in? I’ll bet they haven’t. Don’t try asking anyone in the national office – they’ll ignore you.

    • Donations won’t roll in so long as the discrimination continues. In fact, more companies are planning to stop their BSA contributions because of their discrimination against gay leaders. Just wait.

      • You’re just as hateful as those you say hate you. It seems that there are those who have placed a large target on Scouting with the sole intention of having it all their way or destroying it. It saddens me more than you can imagine. While I was opposed to the change, I resolved myself to accept it & hope that the decision would allow us to move forward together in the spirit of Scouting. Guess not. Sad; very sad indeed.

        • Of course. Why do I want my friends kicked out for no good reason. Makes no sense. Not fair to them and not the Scouting organization we should be.

        • He didn’t say anything hateful. He stated a fact: Donations are going to be short until the discrimination continues. I’ve been scouting for 30 years, and I have stopped contributing. Until BSA reverses their policies, my unit will not participate in fundraising.

      • Brian: Stop with the descrimination crap. You progressives will not stop until the Boy Scouts joyfully become a gay organization. This is not what Boy Scouts is about. We at the local level care about scout advancement and learning, camping and other scout activities. Please go away.

        • I am at the local level and I care about the same thing you do. I’m not sure what a gay organization is, as you describe it. I just think it is rude and un-scoutlike to have an 17 year old gay eagle be fine to lead his troop, but the moment he turns 18, he is kicked out and can’t do that any more. Actually, wait, he can. If he is in Venturing, he is a youth until 21, so he can participate until then. That is logical. But at the new magic age of 21, he can’t lead any more. So is it 18 when gay boys turn evil or 21? I’m not sure.

        • zollweg, a gay organization is one that accepts homosexuality as natural, normal, and a choice of lifestyle, and promoting such as a valid and even beneficial lifestyle. Now that BSA has changed its standards to imply that gay is the way, it will begin advocating for the homosexual lifestyle. If for no other reason than that it needs corporate dollars to survive.

        • Yesterday: correct. It is natural and normal. God does not make mistakes. All boys deserve to learn and grow from the lessons in Scouting. I certainly respect your right to believe what you want. And I feel sorry for any youth who have to endure your attitude. The BSA is changing because it is the right thing to do, not just to get more money. Remember that in the 100+ year history, this was only an issue about 30 years ago, when BSA attorneys drafted a restrictive membership policy. We are correcting that mistake and getting closer to the original intent and spirit of the Scouting movement.

        • Zollweg, you write, “God does not make mistakes.” True enough, but people do. Since you brought up God, what does He say about homosexuality? Man shall not lie with man as he does with woman. Hmm. How about, “And, in like manner, the men also, leaving the natural use of the women, have burned in their lusts one towards another, men with men working that which is filthy, and receiving in themselves the recompense which was due to their error.” We are given intellect, to know the truth, and free will, to choose or not to follow the truth. BSA has chosen to accommodate those who burn in lust for homosexual acts. “Morally straight” was thrown out in favor of the gay lifestyle.

        • zollweg, I agree we have different views. In fact, as the years pass, I find I have less and less in common with people who wear the same uniform as do I. “Morally straight” means something entirely different to today’s Scouts and Scouters. As for Scouting magazine not being a proper forum, I can only quote Baden-Powell himself: “We aim for the practice of Christianity in their everyday life and dealings, and not merely the profession of theology on Sundays,” and “It [religion] does not come in at all. It is already there. It is a fundamental factor underlying Scouting and Guiding.”

    • Think just a minute what you are saying. You have a choice. Participate or not. But ask yourself, do my actions & the words you speak or write match up to the Oath & Law? You need to move on in one way or the other.

  3. I am perfectly game to sell popcorn if my youth get more of the take than trails end and the council.

    My boys are out selling it and getting dog scraps after the 70%. Getting the doors slammed in their face, people screaming at them, one guy nearly tried to shoot one of them (the cops were called.)

    A 24 pack of the SAME popcorn sells in Wal-Mart for $5 – meaning they get about $2.50 per each box.

    40% of a 20 pack at $20 is $8. So Pop-Weaver uses our boys to make up for the loss at Wal-Mart. Very BAD Business.

    I prefer to have them do a fundraiser that don’t get them shot or hurt.

    • Wow. We have never had those kind of experiences. That is frightening. We have had people explain that they don’t support discrimination, share great stories about their scouting and eagle experiences, and had to fight for show and sell locations amongst the over saturation of packs and troops all wanting to schedule at the same places and times… What was really interesting is learning that popcorn is not sold by 1/3 of the councils. Why not? What do they sell? I hope we can get away from it one day

      • Zollweg: You asked what do other Councils who don’t do popcorn sales, and there’s a variety of answers to it. Some Councils are just fine with Friends of Scouting/Investment in Character, council events, and a strong foundation contribution “input”. Other Councils put on Scout shows or rallies and other Council-level events. Despite what some here may think, Trails’ End Popcorn is NOT a part of the BSA’s operation — it seems that way thanks to the cooperation between that firm (and another one, I can’t remember the name off hand) and the BSA’s marketing team.

        Depending on the community, one gets pleasant responses from the sales of popcorn and others well, they are a bit rude about it. What units can do is to separate all of the “national stuff” from the fact that this is THEIR Pack, THEIR Troop or Team, or THEIR Crew or Ship which is selling the popcorn (or anything else) for THEIR UNIT. Not for “national” and not for “Council”, although as we’ve discussed here, the local Council does get some benefit from the sales.

        I made a couple of phone calls last night and was reassured that NO, “National” does not get a DIME from the sales of the popcorn sold from your local Council. Not even in some sort of “kickback scheme”. The reason why not is because it’s your Council’s money — not “national’s money”. The Boy Scouts of America on a national scale is funded differently than the local Councils are. They sell supplies and uniforms, books and manuals. They charge Scouts and Scouters for attendance at Jamborees and their four Outdoor Adventure (“High Adventure”) bases. They ask for those donations from Big Box Inc. and their CEOs and others who have money to share and desire to share some of it with the BSA. They use the registration and Boys’ Life fees. That’s where the “national” money comes from.

        • I appreciate your research, knowledge, and sharing… I can tell you that years where we have said we wouldn’t do popcorn or have not done popcorn, Council and District have made our life as volunteers a living Hell. Multiple calls from both council and district to each and every leader in the unit to try to change our mind. “Shaming” at roundtables. Emails to the unit to try to change our mind and to the families, as if we “forgot” to order. It’s institutional bullying and not scout-like. Most people in our unit either believe we “have” to sell it or know we don’t but feel like maybe we should just to avoid all that ugliness.

        • The best thing to do is simply ignore BSA’s rules on fundraising and do whatever you want. There’s really nothing BSA can do to stop you from having a fundraiser.

        • “Me” stated: “The best thing to do is simply ignore BSA’s rules on fundraising and do whatever you want. There’s really nothing BSA can do to stop you from having a fundraiser.”

          Nice. And I take it you tell your Scouts this…that it’s okay to do whatever you want because nobody’s going to stop or advise you otherwise. You know that Scouting has three aims, and one of them is citizenship development. By your comments, you are stating that that aim has, well, no “aim”. Good luck with that — and good luck to your Scouts you’re teaching by example with that point of view!

        • Mike, you replied much nicer to “Me” than I would have!!! I admire your constraint! I absolutely cannot stand that kind of “do whatever you want” attitude and loathe the fact that type of person is influencing the morals and values of our youth! …I sure hope that was at least a parent-only and not a registered leader! Even their identifier “Me” shows they only think about themselves. I applaud your reply, again! Bryan would have had to censored mine! LOL! :)

  4. In the United Kingdom bag packing as well call it is, by far, our most successful way of fund raising. Interesting how different Associations have different rules.

    • Indeed. At little common sense certainly could go a LONG way. If you live in a locality where the grocery store supports this fundraiser, then good on ya!

  5. What is so infuriating about the national “leaders: is that they are so caught up in how the local troops raise funds, especially in these tough economic times, and then go and raise the dues more than 50%. Nice going guys. Sometimes I wonder if you are for us or against us.

  6. Steve wrote in part and asked: “I’m curious why the reaction is so focused on the donation nature of it compared to the use of uniforms. From what the Unit Money Earning Application says, it seems pretty obvious that for a unit fundraiser scouts should not wear their uniforms. (Why that is doesn’t make sense to me, but that’s not what I’m asking about.) Why was Mark Moshier’s response only to the handling of funds and no mention about the uniforms?”

    The short answer is because Mark doesn’t handle “uniforming” with the BSA, that’s why. As the lead professional on the BSA’s Council Fund Development Team, his role in life is to support local Councils with campaigns and projects which will further their local Councils.

    It has been a long standing policy (written in the BSA’s Charter and Bylaws) that Scouts and Scouters do not “commercialize” wearing the official uniform unless it has been approved IN ADVANCE (not after the fact) by the local Council, representing the “Corporation” (the Boy Scouts of America, Inc.). This has not changed just because we’re living in a new century — as a matter of fact, it has been strengthened by the further trademarking/copyrighting of some of our terms, logos and images. This is all designed to keep the BSA out of the “the official whatever of the BSA” business we WERE in back in the 40s, 50s and early 60s (those of you with earlier versions of our “hymnals” can look in the backside and find all kinds of ads for various products carrying the BSA’s seal… very little of it is done today).

    Bryan can provide us with the name of the BSA professional lead managing our uniform and insignia programming.

  7. Zollweg thanks me for the information and background I’ve shared with all of you (glad to assist) and wrote: “I can tell you that years where we have said we wouldn’t do popcorn or have not done popcorn, Council and District have made our life as volunteers a living Hell. Multiple calls from both council and district to each and every leader in the unit to try to change our mind. “Shaming” at roundtables. Emails to the unit to try to change our mind and to the families, as if we “forgot” to order. It’s institutional bullying and not scout-like. Most people in our unit either believe we “have” to sell it or know we don’t but feel like maybe we should just to avoid all that ugliness.”

    And what do we tell our Scouts when this kind of bullying is going on and you’re not getting any “joy” from informing those directly involved in it? You keep going until you find someone to listen and act upon your bullying and pushing around.

    Have you talked with your Council’s Scout Executive or Commissioner (or both)? Do you realize that they have counterparts at the “state” (Regional Area) and Regional basis?

    Before “taking it higher”, please consider why they are trying to get you to participate. Yes, that ten or fourteen percentage that the Council takes in sounds awfully small in the larger scheme of things…but that’s ten or fourteen percent of their annual budget. If they don’t get a lot of units to participate, they lose money which they either have to raise it someplace else…or everyone does without some part of the Council’s services which everyone has been dependent upon. $50K or so pays for a District Executive for a year. While some will say “good…we really don’t need him or her”, those are typically the people who had little to no usage for the rest of the Council’s services (and I always question “then why are you involved in Scouting…and don’t give me that “it’s for the boys” line, because if it was truly “for the boys”, you will realize that the program extends well past your unit…and it involves other elements, and that professional manager keeps those things together while we’re all working…”).

    But surely, if you’ve explained it to your District’s volunteers and your District Executive WHY your unit does not want to participate, and they keep on pushing your collective chests with their fingers to get you to participate….then it’s time for you to talk with your Council’s Scout Executive and the Council’s Commissioner and ask them to “please tell them to back off…”

    This is what we in Scouting in part teaches our youth. We teach based on our own example and modeling.

    • I get it, but once I say “no” one time, I don’t need to be pestered, and I don’t need to try to find people to complain to. I know they are trying to do their job. they want the money. We also should be teaching that “no means no” in many situations. We all know that council wants us to sell popcorn. If we order it we order it. If we don’t one polite email or call to ask “did you forget or are you participating” is reasonable. Once we say no, there should not be further calls, emails, or pestering whatsoever. All of this is hidden from the boys, so there is no example to teach them here. We hide the boys from the red tape of corporate scouting so they can focus on the details of the program they want to run…

  8. Actually, one of our local grocery chains allows any group to come in and bag groceries as a fundraiser. They pay the troop a lump sum total to the same wage as the baggers who work there for the number of hours they contribute; if the customers want to “tip” the Scouts for bagging or carrying their bags, that is up to them. We don’t solicit for contributions. This type of fundraising in our troop is usually reserved for those Scouts raising funds to attend a high adventure or another specific purpose.

  9. Sometimes these blog comments get WAY OFF TOPIC.

    I started thinking that you should not do this based on the rules stated above. BUT how different is this from a car wash? What if you have a “FREE car wash and take a donation for it? Or do you have to have a set price. A lot of troop do this to get around local laws about taxation and business laws.
    What if the scouts were bagging in only half the available lanes? Then the shoppers would have the option to not use these lanes.

    What if they bagged for free and sold something for the fundraiser at the front door? That sounds like a win-win.

  10. Nothing to stop an individual patrol from bagging for tips on their own as long as it’s not under troop auspices. We set the donation jar on the table near where one of our Scout’s Mothers sits. We don’t actually ask for a tip; it’s totally voluntary

  11. Tom wrote “I started thinking that you should not do this based on the rules stated above. BUT how different is this from a car wash? What if you have a “FREE car wash and take a donation for it? Or do you have to have a set price. A lot of troop do this to get around local laws about taxation and business laws.”

    Which is a great reason why you need to fill out a money-earning form; and why you need to adhear with all local laws and ordinances. If you’re rasing monies for Scouting, you need to set a reasonable price (value) for the service you are providing (washing cars). And you can’t take “donations” — even providing a “donation piggy” or “jar” is not allowed.

    “What if the scouts were bagging in only half the available lanes? Then the shoppers would have the option to not use these lanes.”

    Doesn’t really matter…and you and I know that if a bunch of kids are providing a service, we are more than likely to go where the kids are…

    “What if they bagged for free and sold something for the fundraiser at the front door? That sounds like a win-win.”

    It does sound like a “win-win”, until someone decides that they don’t want to purchase that item.

    Phred wrote: “Nothing to stop an individual patrol from bagging for tips on their own as long as it’s not under troop auspices. We set the donation jar on the table near where one of our Scout’s Mothers sits. We don’t actually ask for a tip; it’s totally voluntary”

    But you’re still doing it as a SCOUTING fundraiser, even if it’s a patrol or even an individual Scout doing it. We don’t take donations. Everything has to stand on its own merits, not “we’re doing this for the BSA”. Yes, your Patrol is a part of a Troop, and therefore they should be a money-earning application submitted so that everyone is aware of the fundraising event.

  12. Mike wrote: “So let’s split this hair with a 21st century twist that once again illustrates the youth are waayyyyy ahead of the Walnut Hill Lane Gang” and provided a link to a crowdsourcing story about a Troop who wants to raise money for a trip to Germany.

    To me, this is no different than making a presentation to a Kiwanis or Lions Club and asking them to help underwrite a Scout’s participation in the National Jamboree, Mike, or to help fund a trip to Philmont or the Summit. Scouts have been doing things like this for decades and it doesn’t violate the spirit of the fundraising policies because the local Council was informed (and gave permission) before the presentation was given.

    If the Troop did not get their Council’s permission, they need to do so and explain how they intend on documenting and “providing value” for those who provided contributions. In the cases of those Scouts and Venturers who did the presentations to various social and service clubs, they return after the event is over and provide a presentation to those same organizations, thanking them and providing feedback as to how their money was spent.

      • Bart wrote: “So getting your groceries bagged doesn’t count as “value” but hearing a little story does?”

        They BOTH count as “value”, but let’s think a bit about the scope.

        In the grocery bagging deal, there is a particular value associated with the bagging. As someone wrote earlier, it could be that the grocery chain has figured out the “cost of having someone to bag groceries” and that’s the cost that the Scouting unit should use.

        In the speaking for a contribution deal, the value comes from those hearing or witnessing the speech or presentation. A good speech, as evident from national speakers, can net a person a lot of money. A lackluster one, and you may get very little if anything.

    • Now this one really puzzles me – how is this not soliciting donations (either the KickStarter or the pitch to Kiwanis, etc.)?

      The guide to money-earning projects states,
      “The BSA Rules and Regulations state, “Youth members shall not be permitted to serve as solicitors of money for their chartered organizations, for the local council, or in support of other organizations. Adult and youth members shall not be permitted to serve as solicitors of money in support of personal or unit participation in local, national, or international events.””

      I doubt very much that groups who go the presentation route are setting a speaking fee for their service so where is the difference between giving a presentation and asking for support and holding a car wash, bagging groceries, etc. without a fixed price for the service?

  13. MT_Momma wrote and asked: “Now this one really puzzles me – how is this not soliciting donations (either the KickStarter or the pitch to Kiwanis, etc.)?

    The guide to money-earning projects states,
    “The BSA Rules and Regulations state, “Youth members shall not be permitted to serve as solicitors of money for their chartered organizations, for the local council, or in support of other organizations. Adult and youth members shall not be permitted to serve as solicitors of money in support of personal or unit participation in local, national, or international events.””

    I think that those lines need to be clarified a bit, for we’ve had a lot instances whereby youth members have provided presentations and speeches — but they have not come right out and said “What I need from you this evening is $300 to help fund our trip to the Cancun” or something like that. What they have done is to explain why their trip to Cancun is important and why the individual or unit is doing the trip now. I am sure that those attending can read between the lines and figure out that it’s going to cost money to get them there and back.

    I know that many Scouts wanting to go to the Jamboree have presented programs to various organizations, stating “I would love to attend and I would do you all proud from my attendance and participation” without stating “…and the reason why I’m here is to see if I can get some funding support from you.” Its a fine line and that’s why that form should be submitted so that folks can sit in an office and hash out where the line is and how best to support the event without crossing that line.

    That’s the best way I can answer it.

    “I doubt very much that groups who go the presentation route are setting a speaking fee for their service so where is the difference between giving a presentation and asking for support and holding a car wash, bagging groceries, etc. without a fixed price for the service?”

    I don’t know personally where that line is, but there is a difference. In speaking, at least in my personal experience, I have to bite my tongue when talking to groups outside of Scouting about donating or direct financial support. I can say things like “Scouting’s important and it needs your public and financial support…” but I can’t say “I’m here to get a check from you to help the Council grow.” I CAN, however, say that during a Friends of Scouting presentation or during a specific Scouting event. When people ask me “how can they support ME in what I do,” I have to turn them down because while I could definitely use the money — the reason why I am there is to bring awareness to the positive values of Scouting and not to fund a trip to Cancun (or anywhere else for that matter). The “value” of my words will become dependent upon each person listening or observing my presentation.

    In holding a car wash or bagging groceries, there is a definite “value” associated with those events, and we in Scouting must be careful not to “price” or “place a value” associated with it because “it’s for the Scouts (meaning “it’s for the BSA”). Instead, we place the value to assist that Patrol with going to Cancun or summer camp; we place the value to assist the Troop with new camping equipment, a new flag and funding the Senior Patrol Leader to NYLE.

  14. I have a question that I would like clarified. As this topic says we can’t solicit funds, does this mean that we cannot solicit donations from local businesses or apply for any grants from say the Walmart foundation? In the past we have requested and received donations from businesses for supply for our blue and gold banquet’s

    • Bob, those kinds of donations and support is best left to your District and Council volunteers and professional to handle. This goes in most cases well above unit fundraising, which is what I understand is the scope of this discussion.

      • Mike,
        B&G fundraising IS unit fundraising. You can’t seriously think my pack should rely on district to solicit donations/discounts for the pack’s event? They’d laugh me all the way home.

  15. Bryan,

    This seems more worthwhile than reselling someone else’s products, whether it be popcorn, wreaths or some of the other fundraisers that I have heard of.

    Does that mean, the store couldn’t give a flat fee for bagging instead of asking for donations at the checkout?

    Michael

    Sent from AOL Mobile Mail

  16. I’m still confused. Perhaps it is the way things are on military installations and the Commissaries.
    The baggers at the Commissaries also work for tips. They provide a “service” and they are in turn “paid” for it. (you can bag your own groceries and/or you can just not pay a tip, there is no obligation, it is a voluntary “donation”).
    So what is the difference if a Scout is providing the service of cleaning a car or a cut Christmas tree (both “services”, since they can both be done by the individual him/herself) or bagging groceries (which can be done by the buyer him/herself)?
    What is the difference in “soliciting” a donation, with an open box with a sign on it that says something like “support your local Boy Scout Troop”, for hanging up garments at a social function? A service is provided and a non-mandatory donation, in any denomination, is rendered……
    There is gray area, please make it more black & white.

    • Kreg, based on the discussion and on Mike Walton’s clarifications, I would have to say that it is pretty black & white (although the Kiwanis, etc. speaking route seems to sit on a razor-fine line):
      -Providing a product or service for a donation is not allowed.
      -Providing a product or service for a fixed price is allowed.
      Scouts should not be in uniform in most cases and unit money earning paperwork should be submitted to your council.

        • Well, phred, regardless of whether you support the Trail’s End product or not, it is a product sold for a fixed price. You either choose to buy it at that price or not. Same is true of the band fruit, baseball chocolates, PTA cookie dough, etc., etc. Products sold as fundraisers are, almost by definition, overpriced. If not, there would be little margin to give to the seller.

    • I would not use a sign that says ‘Boy Scout Troop’, I would use a sign that says ‘summer camp fund’. Leave the Boy Scouts out of it. Since we are supposed to provide value, I believe I would put up a thermometer type chart with the dollar goal written at the top. Each week, hopefully, I could color in a little more of the thermometer. Yes, the store could give a flat fee since you’re now providing a service similar to picking up trash after the festival

  17. Can anyone offer guidance on aluminum can recycling? We have a bin our scouts made, located in our CO parking lot. The proceeds of donated cans help us fund our troop. Is this allowed?

    • Yep, along with paper recycling. Those things help clean our enviorns as well as to provide income for units and/or chartered partner organizations. Whether you go around and collect cans or place a bin and announce this is where your empty cans can go…it’s a good *service project* as well as fund raiser.

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