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Happy 100th birthday, Kenya Scouts Association!

Kenya_Scouts_Association The Boy Scouts of America isn't the only Scouting organization celebrating its 100th Anniversary this year.

The Kenya Scouts Association, one of 160 recognized national Scout organizations in the world, has also reached triple digits in 2010.

As reported in an Associated Press article published in The Washington Post, the Kenya Scouts Association is the oldest Scouting organization in Africa.

Scouting founder Robert Baden-Powell, who made Kenya his second home, organized Africa's first Scout meeting at a church in Nairobi on Nov. 24, 1910. One-hundred years later, Scouts in Kenya are 400,000 strong.

Kenyan President Mwai Kibaki presided over the 100th Anniversary celebration held this month in Nairobi. 

"I note that over the last 100 years, Scouting has continued to contribute greatly to the character formation of thousands of our nation's youth," he told The Associated Press.

Sound familiar? Replace "thousands" with "millions" in that quote, and President Kibaki could be speaking about the Boy Scouts of America. It seems that you can find the positive effects of Scouting in any of the movement's 160 countries and 28 million members worldwide. 

Congratulations, Kenya Scouts Association, and good luck in your next 100 years!

3 Comments on Happy 100th birthday, Kenya Scouts Association!

  1. Happy 100th
    I have written a book to honor the 100th anniversary, The Legacy of Lord Baden-Powell
    and am asking you to join me in recruiting 1 million new Scouts to perpetuate his legacy. go to http://www.youngmenofhonorseries.com
    for more information.

  2. Beverly Armstrong // November 30, 2010 at 9:53 am // Reply

    I have been to Kenya and witnessed the Scout units in the schools in Western Kenya, met with Scout leaders,and visited both Paxtu (Baden-Powell’s home built at the Outspan Hotel, and which is now a museum) and the place where he and Olave are buried. I met a young man, Edwin, who, because no adults in the rural school he attended were interested in leading a scout troop for the younger boys, set out to start a scout unit on his own. They got permission to raise rabbits at the school, which they then sold to the school for school lunch. The money raised paid for their few outings and materials. Edwin had been a Scout and knew how important it was to teach self reliance and self esteem to children in an area where not a single child has not been affected by the loss of a family member because of AIDS. We notified the local leaders to make sure Edwin was properly trained and supported. He inspired me in his determination, commitment and personal sacrifices to make Scouting in his part of the world happen.

  3. Live long scouting

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